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WELCOME TO THE MEMPHIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

MAGS Monthly Meetings are held at 7:00pm on the second Friday of each month
in the Fellowship Hall of Shady Grove Presbyterian Church, 5530 Shady Grove Road, Memphis, TN.
Youth and adult visitors are always welcome at MAGS meetings. CLICK HERE FOR A LOCATION MAP.

Click here for information on how you can become a MAGS member.

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The Earth Wide Open Show
 
August 2019 MAGS Events
08.01.2019 6:30pm MAGS Board Meeting: St. Frances Hospital, St. Claire Room
08.09.2019 7:00pm

MAGS Membership Meeting: Shady Grove Presbyterian Church: adults, youth and visitors join together for the 2019 Rocking Rock Swap and Picnic. See the first news article below for details.

08.17.2019 TBA MAGS Field Trip: Parkin Archaeological Museum, Parkin, AR

We have monthly programs for both adults and youth.
Check the calendar above for dates and program information.

IMPORTANT NOTE:
Non-members are not permited to participate in any MAGS field trips.
This includes all areas: public, private collecting, and pay sites. No exceptions.

FROM THE AUGUST 2019 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
2019 Rocking Rock Swap

Rocking Swap

08.03.18: MIKE BALDWIN: Get ready for a Rocking Rock Swap on August 9! Visitors are welcome. This would be a great time to check out the club and meet some new friends. I will be bringing my geode cracker. If you have a geode you need opened, bring it with you. Here are a few other things you need to bring. [01] Bring money if you plan to buy at the rock swap/sell. [02] If you are planning to sell or swap, bring your own table, your own material, and a rock or mineral donation for the door prize drawing. [03] Bring a lot of food. If your last name begins with A-H bring appetizers, side dishes or veggies. I-T bring main course dishes. U-Z bring desserts. Activities at the swap/picnic include: [01] Music hits from the 1950s and 1960s; [02] Guess what rock/fossil is iniside the jar; [03] Name those dinosaurs; and 901 Rocks. Come early to help set up and/or stay late to help clean up. Read more in the August issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE JULY 2019 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Chucalissa Display Case and Native American Pottery

07.04.19: MIKE BALDWIN: This beautiful display case and the pottery housed in it are the result of a collaboration between the Memphis Archaeological and Geological Society and the C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa. The pottery inside this case has not been viewed by the general public until now. All the pots were found during excavations at the Chucalissa Indian Village years ago. The case was dedicated to the memory of 21-year MAGS member, Sherri Baldwin on Saturday, July 6. Read about this and other MAGS activities in the July issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE JUNE 2019 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
MAGS and Chucalissa: Seven Decades of Collaboration

Chucalissa

06.02.19: MATTHEW LYBANON: In the early 1950s, the Memphis Archaeological and Geological Society played a crucial role in the founding of Chucalissa. MAGS Members participated in excavations at the site and promoted development of the museum, working closely with the first director, C. H. Nash. In the following decades, MAGS continued to be involved with the museum in a variety of ways. Read more in the June issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE MAY ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
The Geologic History of the Lower Mississippi River Valley

Lower Mississippi

05.02.18: DR. RANDEL COX, UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS: The Lower Mississippi River Valley runs from Cairo, Illinois,
four hundred miles south to the Gulf of Mexico, where it merges imperceptibly with the coastal plain of Louisiana. East to west, it extends from the rocky hills of middle Tennessee to the Ozarks. To learn more about the Lower Mississippi River Valley and much, much more, check out the May Rockhound News.

05.02.2019: MIKE BALDWIN: Thank you to all friends and club members for helping to make THE EARTH WIDE OPEN 2019 a huge success! Click here and learn more about The Earth Wide Open. Check out the April Rockhound News

FROM THE MARCH 2018 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Adult Program [Crater of Diamonds] and Youth Program [What Are Fossils?]

Crater of Diamonds

03.04.2019: MATTHEW LYBANON: During the March adult program, Mike Howrd will cover the geology, istory of discovery and exploration, unusual facts about the diamonds, things to see in the Park, how to hunt for diamonds, and more. Jane Coop will present the March youth program on "What Are Fossils and How Are They Made?"
Read more about MAGS activities and interests in the March issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2019 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
"Bones: Then and Now" and "Mountain Building"

February Fossils

02.03.19: MIKE BALDWIN: At the February adult membership meeting Jane Coop gave the adults a brief history of dinosuar discoveries and talked about the adventurous aspects of bone-hunting. While the adults' program was underway, the youth talked about mountain-building processes and did an graham cracker/marshmallow creme edible mountain-building experiment. Read more in the February issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE JANUARY ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
"Parkin Site Research" and "The Colors of Mars"

Parkin Site Research

01.03.19: MATTHEW LYBANON: Since the 1960s, the Parkin site has been a treasure of knowledge for archeologists. Located in Cross County, Arkansas, it features one of the best preserved Mississippian Period occupation sites in all of Arkansas. We learned more about Parkin during the January adult program. During the January MAGS youth meeting, we took a closer look at the colors of the surface of Mars. The rusty red color that the planet is known for is derived from iron oxide, like the rust color you might see as iron oxidizes on Earth. Read more in the January Rockhound News.

FROM THE NOVEMBER 2018 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
A night of information at the School of Rock

11.04.18: MIKE BALDWIN: Join MAGS for the November School of Rock. The program will include table displays and information on [01] rock tumbling, [02] crystal cleaning, [03] rock drilling, [04] jewelry making, [05] wire wrapping, [06] coppersmithing, [06] metal detecting, [07] Indian artifacts, [08] geode cracking, [09] fluorescent minerals, [10] rock types and the rock cycle, and [11] a silent and exuberant-yelling auction. Read more in the November Rockhound News.

FROM THE OCTOBER 2018 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Amber

amber

10.01.18: DAVE CLARKE, MAGS MEMBER: What do we know about prehistoric life preserved in amber from the time of the dinosaurs? Has blood really been extracted from a fossilized insect like we saw in Jurassic Park? Is amber a mineral or gemstone, or is it a fossil? Read more in the October Rockhound News and hear Dave's amber presentation in person at the October MAGS meeting.

FROM THE SEPTEMBER 2018 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
The Looper Collection

09.05.18: DR. NINA L. BAGHAI-RIDING: The late Pleistocene of North America is characterized by vertebrate animals (mostly mammals weighing ≥ 44 kg) including American mastodon, bison, giant ground sloth, and giant short-faced bear. Read more in the September issue of Rockhound News.

HERE'S A VERY IMPORTANT WEBLINK FOR YOU FROM THE TN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Click on the image below to learn about Tennessee fossils

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PUBLICATIONS [listed by permission of owner]
T.O. Fuller Excavation
Coon Creek Fossils: Part 1
Coon Creek Fossils: Part 2
Lower Devonian Fossils of West Tennessee

The 50mm-wide specimen represented here is Dalmanites retusus. Known only from isolated pygidia. The pygidium is distinct from other Birdsong trilobites in that it has a rounded profile and lacks a pygidial spine.

Excerpt from Devonian Fossils of West Tennessee, by Kieran Davis.

The Lower Devonian system is well represented in Tennessee, forming part of an almost unbroken sequence of deposits ranging in age from the Middle Silurian to upper Lower Devonian. The Ross Formation of west-central Tennessee contains the most diverse and abundant Lower Devonian invertebrate fauna and this guide focuses on the most fossiliferous member of the Ross--the Birdsong Shale. The Birdsong Shale is well exposed in road cuts along State Highway 69 and in the many active and disused quarries of western Tennessee.

Click here or on the trilobite to download your copy of this 40-page PDF.

Late Pleistocene Megafauna From Mississippi Plain Gravel Bars

Excerpt from Late Pleistocene Megafauna, by Dr. Nina L. Baghai-Riding, Danielle B. Husley, Christine Beck, and Eric Blackwell.

The late Pleistocene of North America is characterized by vertabrate animals (mostly mammals weighing ≥ 44kg) including Mammut americanum (American mastodon), Bison spp. (bison), Megalonyx jeffersonii, and Arctodus simus. Disarticulated skeletal elements of vertebrate fauna are frequently exposed on floodplain and gravel bar deposits after floodwaters retreat throughout the Mississippi Alluvial Plain.

Click here or on the lefthand image to download your copy of this 24-page PDF.

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EXPLORE MAGS A LITTLE BIT MORE
The Earth Wide Open
Pictures
MAGS Field Guide
For information about The Earth Wide Open, the annual Rock Show sponsored by MAGS and held at the AgriCenter in Memphis, TN, click here.
 
In addition to the Gallery listed in the top navigation, you can find pictures of MAGS events in our Online Album and picture pages such as these:
2014 Sugar Creek Field Trip
 
Click here to visit, ask questions, or leave comments on the MAGS Field Guide to Rocks, Minerals and Fossils. Click here for an index of topics on the blog.
Chucalissa Indian Village

CHUCALISSA (Choctaw word meaning "Abandoned House"): The ruins of this native American town sit on the Mississippi bluff five miles south of downtown Memphis. At one time the population of Chucalissa could have been a thousand to fifteen hundred. The town existed into the seventeenth century, when its townspeople left and never returned. Hence, the name Chucalissa. Since most native Americans north of the Rio Grande never developed a written language, we can never know the town's real name.

Read about MAGS' involvement in the early years of Chucalissa.

ON THE WEB
Visit the MAGS Flickr gallery of pictures

MAGS MEMBERS: We now have a place to showcase your field trip, rock show, and mineral-collecting vacation pictures. Visit our Flickr gallery of pictures. If you have pictures you would like to share, send them to the MAGS webmaster and [if they are pictures all members of MAGS would enjoy] he will get them in the gallery.

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MAGS logo

MAGS Contact:
WC McDaniel
2038 Central Ave
Memphis TN 38104
901.274.7706
email: WC McDaniel

 

MAGS is a member of:
The American Federation of Mineralogical Societies

 

MAGS is a member of:
The Southeast Federation
of Mineralogical Societies

"When out fossil hunting, it is very easy to forget that rather than telling you how the creatures lived, the remains you find indicate only where they became fossilized."
–– Richard E. Leakey


 

 


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© 1998-2019 Memphis Archaeological and Geological Society. This page last updated 08.03.2019.